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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
but to run in next year's boston marathon. >> i'm so blessed. i'm so lucky. >> reporter: caitlin tate. her leg was badly damaged. this photo captures the moment caitlin's friend leo saved her life. >> when you look at that incredible picture of him carrying you away, what goes through your mind? >> god had angels watching me that day. >> reporter: leo rushed caitlin to mass general hospital. >> the one thing that struck us is how many were running towards where the bombs went off not away from it. you know. it says a lot about the people of our city. >> let's hope nothing like this ever happens again. >> reporter: and caitlin had a special visitor, president barack obama. >> reporter: what did he say to you? >> he shook our hands and told us we were strong and an inspiration to other people. >> reporter: caitlin is recovering so well, she could be released this week. what message do you have for everyone watching? >> i think that life should go on. we should continue and stay strong and -- not avoid or be scared of events. because there's dangerous people out there like this. >> reporter:
and thank you for coming. (applause) >> caitlin young. >> i didn't think i planned to talk. i'm caitlin young and i'm from omaha, nebraska. we nominated our senior painter, jeff nicole. he was with the city program 15 years ago, he basically ran it since it started. he ran it for 10 years by himself all over our city. and, so, just through all that he's never changed his dedication. he doesn't take shortcuts, repaint and color match and do all public and private property in our city. so, just his dedication in our program has made a huge difference in our city. we appreciate it. (applause) [laughter] >> congratulations. (applause) >> lisa mc kenzie. >> okay. i'm accepting this award for mike yeager and bill mcdonnis, [speaker not understood]. i think all the cities that have volunteer programs it's usually a handful of volunteers that do a majority of the work. these guys are both retired and they have accomplished so much within their neighborhood. they live in one of the biggest neighborhood associations -- excuse me, homeowner associations in san antonio, about 5,000 houses. so, he w
carrying a wounded woman moments after the marathon bombing. this is them today. caitlin case tells us her story from her hospital room. the friend who saved her life, leo, at her bedside. when you look at that incredible picture, of him carrying you away, what goes through your mind? >> god had angels watching me that day. >> reporter: caitlin was watching the marathon monday, from the finish line when her world changed. leo was right there. >> the first explosion went off, we went to the gunand he jumped told me to stay down in case there were anymore explosives. and then, he picked me up and carried me to where his car is. tied a blanket and his shirt around my leg to stop the bleeding. >> my instinct was to pick her up. >> reporter: leo rushed caitlin to the hospital. that quick thinking saved her life and leg. she is 1 of more than 170 people injured that day. while there were more than 20 in critical condition, today there are only 3 people left on that critical list. this morning, cardinal sean o'malley had a mass to honor those that died. just as the friends and family of one of th
discussion, this one on violence. deanne stillman "desert reckoning" caitlin rother "lost girls" and david mcconnell "american honor killings." this is live coverage. >> as well as the fire bread which came out in 2003. his short fiction and journalism has appeared widely in magazines and anthologies in his new book "american honor killings" was released this year. david lives in new york city and beside david is deanne stillman and deanne wrote "desert reckoning" based on stones peace. that book won the 2013 spur award for best contemporary nonfiction. her previous book, mustang with l.a. times best book of 2008 and won the california book awards silver medal for nonfiction. her book twentynine palms was an l.a. times best book 2001 and it has just been reissued and she lives in l.a.. and beside me is caitlin rother. rother has written a hoax fiction and nonfiction. a pulitzer prize investigative journalist. rother worked for nearly 20 years for daily newspapers and made scores of tv and radio appearances as a crime expert. her latest book "lost girls" came out last year and she lives in san
recovering from horrible injuries they still suffered in the place. one of them is 25-year-old caitlin cates she nearly lost her life. she was just at the finish line when the first blast knocked her off her feet injuring her lower leg. dr. marc siegel spoke to caitlin. he is live outside the hospital. doctor? >> it was a great privilege to meet caitlin and her friend leo in mass general hospital. she is an inspiration. she said she will not let the terrorists win as she recovers. she was at finish line. got blown off her feet by the bomb. leo put his t-shirt on the wound and carried her off to safety. >> i never looked back once he was carrying me. my head was in his chest and my hands were elevating my leg in the air. so i think he saw more than i did but i never looked back until i saw the pictures and all the people on the ground. >> a decade of war has prepared our surgeons here, civilian surgeons to be able to operate on these people. i spoke to dr. david king, who was both a trauma surgeon in iraq and also worked on the patients as they recovered. let's hear what he had to say? >> all
, caitlin rother and david mcconnell. it's about an hour. >> welcome to all of you. looking forward to a spirited discussion. the forpat will be i will --le o format will be i will ask a couple questions of all the panelists, and then i will havea a couple questions for each of the panelists about their specific works after which we will take some time for questions from all of you who are with us today in the sessionment so, first i would like to ask all three of you, your genre of nonfiction true crime differs quite a bit from mine and from several other stories of nonfiction. mine is typically called current affairs of sociology, biography being another that comes to mind related to this sort of work you do in a certain way. but current events and current affairs types of approaches have a fair amount in common i think as all nonfiction with the work you do, specifically the work requires a lot of research. and we write about real people, real events and we try to do that in a way that has -- and that is quite compelling. so what i want to ask you is if you have thought about how
had angels watching me y rorter: at mass gener, caitlin kates, credits her friend, leo for saving her life and carrying her to safety. charges haven't been filed yet but will likely include a weapon of mass destruction charge which does carry the weight of the death penalty. john and diana. >> brandi hitt. thank you. she mentioned friday night's dramatic events. abc's martha raddatz has spoken to the police chief of watertown, massachusetts, where the manhunt came to an end. >> reporter: the video images show the dramatic end to the manhunt, more clearly than anything we have seen. the police helicopter hovers in the darkness, holding steady, the natural heat from the suspect's body making a near perfect outline through thermal imaging despite the tarp that covers him. he is lying on his back, his head to the right, feet to the left. then a flash. a bang. police toss a stun grenade meant to confuse the suspect. then another. followed by a third. and then, watch, at first motionless, we see for the fst time, video as the 19-year-old raises his head, his upper body. >> he is moving. fla
stillman caitlin rother and david mcconnell. we are live on the university of southern california south of downtown los angeles. as you can see it's a picture-perfect southern california day. the chamber of commerce could not have ordered a nicer day. our live coverage continues. over here on our set next to the c-span bus we are joined by beau kilmer who is one of the co-authors of this book, "marijuana legalization" what everyone needs to know. mr. kilmer is with the rand corporation. mr. kilmer if you would start by making an argument for legalizing marijuana and against legalizing marijuana. >> guest: there are a number of arguments that could be made on either side. some folks who want to legalize marijuana aren't happy with the fact that there are 800,000 arrests every year for marijuana possession. they are unhappy that people are being put through the criminal system for a substance that they believe is safer than alcohol and some people argue that if you were to legalize marijuana he would be able to pass it and that would generate revenue. on the the other side lot of people h
school, where stenzelle recently spoke. caitlin campbell is the student body vice president. she skipped the speech in protest, but she did watch it online. good morning, and thank you for being here. >> good morning. >> why did you decide to skip stenzel's speech? >> well, the night before the assembly, a teacher called me who was really concerned. she said, you know, i was instructed not to tell anyone about the assembly, but this is the nature. and she read to me a bit of the flyer that stated that the purpose of stenzel's speech was to explain god's plan for sexual purity. i began to spread the worded that this was going to occur so if they wanted to they could opt out. i'm personally offended by what pam stenzel said to the student body on the basis i believe as a woman it's my choice whether i want to have sex. i believe in a public school setting we should be informed as to how best to protect ourselves if we make the choice to have sex. >> she did say in her speech she wasn't there to tell you when to have sex or not to have sex. she was just there to present the dangers that cam
, the mother of 14-year-old caitlin, has gone to bat for girls who want to bare a little more at the dance. your daughter and your friends tell me you've become the hero, the cool mom. >> reporter: that's not to say she hasn't caused flak for standing up for strapless dresses. >> some say i'm naive and i don't realize what young boys do. if i'm doing a good job as a parent, i have to trust them when they're not with me. >> reporter: this mom wrote a three-page letter to the school superintendent, that the dress code is arbitrary and a violation of every girl's fundamental rights. >> there's no basis for this restriction. there's no evidence behind it. >> reporter: as for the students, we spoke with argue it's virtually impossible not to go strapless in today's strapless-dress-loving world. >> it's like spaghetti strap ps. >> reporter: dress codes for school dances are hardly knew. schools throughout the nation are asking students to wear dresses that aren't too low-cut, too short or bare too many cutouts. these teens say they're hopeful the school board will reverse the principal's decisio
with a big heart, caitlin. just so much touching -- let's walk over here. you can see this poster board here is a magic marker left behind so you can write a message. stay strong, boston, love from tom from norway. these poster boards are changed out by volunteers as they go filled up. there were so many messages on the poster board, you almost couldn't read them. come on over here, too, here are candles lit for the victims who died in the bombings. and also for those left behind. another they think i wanted to tell you about is the boston mayor, mayor menino, over the weekend he urged people to come down up to. he wanted them to shop on boylston street. so on saturday, there was no fee for parking. no parking tickets handed out. all the mayor asked for was that people spend 25 bucks in restaurants and businesses in this area so that commerce could be revived. and i must say, it worked because -- i want to come over here and talk to sean, too. you're from boston. you're a life long boston recent can dent. when you look at this memorial, what does it mean to you? >> shouldn't have ever happen
school teacher caitlin boyd. her unforgettable account of what happened, sadness, anger and hope. >>> the latest legal battle from michael jackson's family. his mother pointing fingers, and tough questions jurors must answer in a case that could bring home tough memories for jackson's loved ones. >>> tuesday was a very busy day at fulton county jail all day long. indicted atlanta teachers and administrators showed up one by one. >> one of the last to arrive, the former superintendent beverly hall and faces a $7.5 million bond and decades behind bars. accused of allowing a widespread cheating scandal to go on. steve osunsami reports from atlanta. >> reporter: one by one, implicated atlanta teachers, principals and administrators surrendered at county jail, accused of falsifying student achievement tests to gin up scores. for some bail set at $1 million or more. >> al capone i understand it didn't have to post a $1 million bond. >> 35 face racketeering and other charges. at one school accused of holding parties where they erased the wrong answers and filled in the right ones. prose
at the age of 87. michael miller at, then and john mccain . caitlin foran. calls, e-so take your mails, and tweets. on c-span.astern but >> we like to think it is an important book. there are few good books out there and explain how to go about this. we see these cases that split the court 5-4. what do they really say? it is not about capital punishment, but how the court operates. the notes back and forth between justices available, and a lot of stuff is available, i am not a lawyer. i was just fascinated by the human side of it. in many cases, you can see justices have reservations about capital punishment. >> the capital punishment cases that defined the supreme court. 9:00 p.m. t at sitting down with then white to talk about the federal budget. and the decision to support same-sex marriage. friday, hillary clinton talked about business initiatives. .he former first lady spoke [applause] >> welcome everybody to the women of the world summit. [applause] we have an incredible night last night with meryl streep and angelina jolie, and those amazing women from pakistan. today we will br
first-class caitlin foran. we will also talk to captain steven trainer about training for midgetman. and later, navy secretary ray mavis. we will also take your calls, e- mail's, and tweets. 7am easter on cspan. anight on first ladies, conversation on the lives of three first ladies. we will look at the political partnership between sarah palin and her husband james polk. [applause] thank you. thank you very much. thank you. mr. president, mr. speaker, statewide elected officials, family, friends. it is my privilege to stand before you again before we start remarks. i will ask that you join me in a moment of silent prayer for a friend of ours. i was on the phone with senator john smith. i know he wants to be with us. he is with us in spirit and he is making a speedy recovery. i know you join me in this moment of prayer for him and his family that he makes that recovery so he can join us in the senate chamber just as quickly as doctors allow him to do that. join me in a moment of silence for john smith. amen. thank you. t is indeed my honor and privilege to stand before you again as
for this vacancy on this court caitlin halligan who waited more than 900 days for a up-or-down vote. she came with the american bar association's highest rating, glowing recommendations from bipartisan supporters, in a diverse legal career marked by distinctive services as new york's solicitor general. nevertheless republicans successfully filibustered her nomination and last month president obama withdrew ms. halligan from nomination. we have a chance today a fresh start with mr. srinivasan who would serve well and ably on the d.c. court of appeals. as he demonstrated he has a sharp legal mind. he served in the solicitor general's office for both republican and democratic administrations. he has served in the private sector and the public sector and earned bipartisan support from those who have worked with him. he has been endorsed publicly in a letter from 12 former solicitors general and principal deputy solicitors general, six democrats and six republicans arrest those who served in republican and democrat administrations. the letter signed by conservative luminaries notes mr. srinivasan
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)